Zimoun >> [Rattling Boxes]

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Hundreds of cardboard boxes, stacked on top of each other, rising high above you like a coliseum built by homeless people. (For vicious fighting over who gets to eat the stray cat they found, I assume.)

Now add two hundred DC motors to the two thousand cardboard elements.

Think of a toddler, playing with the perpetually-fun cardboard box, banging on it over and over again. Now multiply that by two hundred and you’ll sort of get what it’s like to stand in the middle of one of Zimoun’s sound sculptures- playful and elementary, yet perceived differently by some.

Like the one pictured above done in collaboration with architect Hannes Zweife, kept in the Contemporary Art Museum in Bucharest, Romania, each construction by Zimoun is as simple and elegant as the last. The rawness of form is due to a somewhat scientific approach of analyzing the “ongoing interplay between the ‘artificial’ and the ‘organic'”, [about] leaving only the essential variables in the graceful exploration. The wanton battering of cardboard eschews annoyance and breathes, rather, a simple complexity of space, sound, and sight, and the creation itself fashions a sense of natural beauty. Surrounded by the gentle pattering on cardboard, the din alludes to the sound of rain- a simple comfort juxtaposed with the architectural complexity.

This poetic nature is found to be an underlying theme as each sound sculpture shouts sweetly, the often-flailing wires creating within the creation. The multitudinous and discreet mechanical sculptures act as composite speakers with the many motors throwing off sound waves that culminate in a thunder left to be explored by the audience.

Now, enough of the poetic exaltation. This is the internet- pictures are much louder than words.

(Oh, and videos. Those can get pretty loud, too)

[In case you’re bad at judging the exact size of objects from pictures on the internet, the above exhibition is 49.2 x 29.5 x 14.7 ft. Pretty immense.]

 

And a video of Zimoun’s projects in general:

[via booooooooom]

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